Package Mangement in Solaris

November 22, 2009

Here are the list of useful commands frequently used during package management.

pkgadd

Adds software packages to the system

pkgrm

Removes software packages from the system

pkginfo

Displays software package information

pkgchk

Checks the accuracy of a software package installation

So, we’ll take an example to use above commands. I’ve a package called SUNWant.Z, which I want to install.

So I use the following syntax to add a package.

pkgadd -d SUNWant.Z

To check whether your package has been installed, you can use pkginfo and grep the output to find a specific package.

pkginfo | grep SUNWant

To check the accuracy of the package, you can use pkgchk command as:

pkgchk SUNWant

To remove above package, we have the pkgrm command to use:

pkgrm SUNWant

Refer the Sun documentation for further details.

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How to configure telnet to login as root

September 23, 2009

By default, telnet is enabled to be access by remote logins for a non-root user. To allow a root user to access the telnet remotely you will have to explicitly allow it.

This can be done by commenting the following line in the file /etc/default/login:

# CONSOLE=/dev/console

But please understand the security threat behind this, first telnet is insecure and hence is not suggested method of remote access, instead use SSH. Besides allowing remote login for root via telnet is a big NO NO.

You’ve been warned!


How to enable root access to SSH

May 23, 2009

To perform this you need to access the terminal physically or via telnet. And obviously you have to be a root user.

From terminal, use a text editor like vi to open the configuration file of SSH

# vi /etc/ssh/sshd_config

Now look for following line in the file:

PermitRootLogin no

You need to replace the ‘no’ with ‘yes’ to enable SSH.

Save the file and exit.

Restart the SSH service with the following command:

# svcadm restart network/ssh

That’s it, you’re done.